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Cooling Your Home Naturally

Thursday, June 13, 2013   /   by Veronica Johnson

Cooling Your Home Naturally

 

Keeping cool indoors when it is hot outdoors is a problem. The sun beating down on our homes causes indoor temperatures to rise to uncomfortable levels. Air conditioning provides some relief. But the initial costs of installing an air conditioner and the electricity costs to run it can be high. In addition, conventional air conditioners use refrigerants made of chlorine compounds, suspected contributors to the depletion of the ozone layer and global warming. But there are alternatives to air conditioning. This information provides some common  sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to help you "keep your cool"- and save electricity.

   
Staying Cool    

    

An alternative way to maintain a cool house or reduce air conditioning use is natural (or passive) cooling. Passive cooling uses non-mechanical methods to maintain a  comfortable indoor temperature.

   

The most effective method to cool your home is to keep the heat from building up in the first place. The primary source of heat buildup (i.e., gain) is sunlight absorbed by your house through the roof, walls, and windows. Secondary sources are heat generating appliances in the home and air leakage. Specific methods to prevent heat gain include reflecting heat (i.e., sunlight) away from your house, blocking the heat, removing built up heat, and reducing or eliminating heat generating sources in your home.


   

Reflecting Heat Away

    

The most effective method to cool your home is to keep the heat from building up in the first place. Dull, dark colored home exteriors absorb 70% to 90% of the radiant energy from the sun that strikes the home's surfaces. Some of this absorbed energy is then transferred into your home by way of conduction, resulting in heat gain. In contrast, light colored surfaces effectively reflect most of the heat away from your home.

  
 Installing a radiant barrier    

 

Radiant barriers are easy to install. It does not matter which way the shiny surface faces - up or down. But you must install it on the underside of your roof - not horizontally   over the ceiling, and the barrier must face an airspace.

   

For your own comfort while in the attic, install the radiant barrier on a cool, cloudy day. Use plywood walk boards or wooden planks over the ceiling joists for support. Caution: Do not step between the ceiling joists, or you may fall through the ceiling.


  

Staple the foil to the bottom or side of the rafters, draping it from rafter to rafter. Do not worry about a tight fit or small tears in the fabric; radiant transfer is not affected by air movement. The staples should be no more than 2 to 3 inches (5 to 8 centimeters) apart to prevent air circulation from loosening or detaching the radiant barrier. Use a caulking gun to apply a thin bead of construction adhesive to the rafters along the seams of the foil barrier. This will make the installation permanent.

    

Roofs

    

About a third of the unwanted heat that builds up in your home comes in through the roof. This is hard to control with traditional roofing materials. For example, unlike most light colored surfaces, even white  asphalt and fiberglass shingles absorb 70% of the solar radiation. One good solution is to apply a reflective coating to your existing roof.      Two standard roofing coatings are available at your local hardware store  or lumberyard. They have both waterproof and reflective properties and are marketed primarily for mobile homes and recreational vehicles. One coating is white latex that you can apply over many common roofing materials, such as asphalt and fiberglass shingles, tar paper, and metal.

  

A second coating is asphalt based and contains glass fibers and aluminum particles. You can apply it to most metal and asphalt roofs. Because it has a tacky surface, it attracts dust, which reduces its reflective somewhat. 

   

Another way to reflect heat is to install a radiant barrier on  the underside of your roof. A radiant barrier is simply a sheet of aluminum foil with a paper backing. When installed correctly, a radiant barrier can reduce heat gains through your ceiling by about 25%. (see box for information on installing a radiant barrier.)

  


Radiant barrier materials cost between $0.13 per square foot ($1.44 per square meter) for a single-layer product with a kraft-paper backing and $0.30 per square foot ($3.33 per square meter) for a vented multiflora product with a fiber-reinforced backing. The latter product doubles as insulation.

   

 Walls

 
Wall color is not as important as roof color, but does affect heat gain somewhat. White exterior walls absorb less heat than dark walls, and light, bright walls increase the longevity of siding, particularly on the east, west, and south sides of the house.    

 

Windows

   

Roughly 40% of the unwanted heat that builds up in your home comes in through windows. Reflective window coatings are one way to reflect heat away from your home. These coatings are plastic sheets treated with dyes or thin layers of metal. Besides keeping your house cooler, these reflective coatings cut glare and reduce fading of furniture, draperies, and carpeting.

    


Two main types of coatings include sun-control films and combination films. Sun-control films are best for warmer climates because they can reflect as much as 80% of the incoming sunlight. Many of these films are tinted, however, and tend to reduce light transmission as much as they reduce heat, thereby darkening the room.

    

Combination films allow some light into a room but they also let some heat in and prevent interior heat from escaping. These films are best  for climates that have both hot and cold seasons. Investigate the different film options carefully to select the film that best meets your needs. Note: do not place reflective coatings on south facing windows if  you want to take advantage of heat gain during the winter. The coating are applied to the interior surface of the window. Although you can apply the films yourself, it is a good idea to have a professional install the coatings, particularly if you have several large windows. This will ensure a more durable installation and a more aesthetically      pleasing look.

       

Blocking the Heat

   

Two excellent methods to block heat are insulation and shading. Insulation helps keep your home comfortable and saves money on mechanical cooling systems such as air conditioners and electric fans.  Shading devices block the sun's rays and absorb or reflect the solar heat.


  

Saving Energy    

Using any or all of these strategies will help keep you cool. Even if  you use air conditioning, many of these strategies, may not be enough. Sometimes you need to supplement natural cooling with mechanical devices. Fans and evaporative coolers can supplement your cooling strategies and cost less to install and run than air conditioners.    

 

Ceiling fans make you feel cooler. Their effect is equivalent to lowering the air temperature by about 4°f (2°c). Evaporative coolers use about one-fourth the energy of conventional air conditioners.

    

Many utility companies offer rebates and other cost incentives when you purchase or install energy saving products, such as insulation and      energy efficient lighting and appliances. Contact your local utility company to see what it offers in the way of incentives.

    
 

Other Cooling strategies to consider:     

    •     
    • lighten roof and exterior wall color

    

replace/coat roof with bright white or shiny material

   

install a radiant barrier

    

  • add reflective coatings to windows

    

  • insulate attic and walls

    

  • caulk and weather strip to seal air leaks

    

  • add shade trees, bushes, or vines

 

  • add exterior awnings and shades

 

  • add interior drapes and shades

    

  • ventilate attic

    

  • increase natural ventilation

    

  • isolate heat-generating appliances

    

  • replace heat-generating appliances

 

  • replace light bulbs with energy-efficient fluorescents


    
                   

 

       

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